Audisto Ranking Issue Checker

How to detect issues with ranking factors on your website

If a quick onpage SEO audit needs to be done, this is the list of hints that helps doing so.

The “ranking hints” group helps you to identify issues that can influence the ranking of a website directly or indirectly or have influence on the search result snippet. Solving problems with

  • Robots directives
  • Titles
  • Meta Description

can drive more traffic to your website.

With this hints section you can identify the most common mistakes, that have negative impact on your ranking in search result.

Example: Audisto Ranking Issue Check with the ranking hint reports for the current crawl

Audisto Ranking Issue Check with the ranking hint reports for the current crawl

Here is the list of all specific hints related to the ranking of a website in search results, that can be identified with the help of the Audisto Crawler.

Table Of Content

Hints

<a> more than 100 links

Description

If more than 100 unique links are found, the URL is flagged with this hint.

Example

Resources of the following categories often trigger this hint:

  • HTML Sitemaps
  • Link listing pages
  • Category pages
  • Archive pages
  • Filter navigation
Importance

Search engines suggest not to exceed a reasonable number of links on a single document. Too many links in a document affect the file size and usability of a document. 100 links on URL are not necessarily a problem. 100 links was the maximum number of links suggested by Google some years ago. However, Google refrained from communicating an exact number, because it depends on the document and context what exactly is a reasonable number of links.

Operating Instruction

Evaluate the internal links in the documents found by this report. Consider removing links that don't add value and/or don't get clicked by users.

If this report contains a large percentage of all crawled URLs, you might consider removing links from elements, that are present on all URLs, e.g. top navigation, sidebar, footer.

<form> method is GET

Description

If a form using the GET-method is found, the URL is flagged with this hint. This report shows all URLs on the crawled website, which contain forms, that are using the GET-method.

Example
<form method="GET" action="/submit.php">
...
</form>
Importance

If forms are submitted with the GET method, the form input data will become part of the URL that is requested. They are accessible to everyone who knows the exact URL, e.g. user, bots and search engines. This may lead to unexpected direct requests to these URLs.

If GET URLs are unexpectedly called out of context, it may result in waste of crawl budget and issues with the crawl rate. Furthermore, the GET method is defined as cacheable by default. Any URL generated by a form that uses the GET method may therefore be cached if not indicated otherwise, e.g. by status code or cache policy.

It is also noteworthy, that any form that uses the GET method along with free defineable input fields without restrictions, allows to generate an unlimited number of unique URLs. If these get crawled and indexed, this might lead to issues with the crawl budget as well as with the indexing budget. This situation can be exploited for negative SEO.

Operating Instruction

If it is not your intention to generate URLs that can be acessed out of the form context, switch the form method to POST. Internal search forms often trigger this hint. You might consider blocking bots in the robots.txt from crawling the form action URL.

To avoid user experience problems after switching to the POST method, you might want to utilize the PRG-pattern. This avoids problems when reloading the document. If the PRG pattern is not used, the browser will ask the user to resubmit the form, if the URL is reloaded.

<h1> and <h2> not found

Description

If no h1- and h2-headline are found, the URL is flagged with this hint. Use this report to discover all documents on the crawled website, that do not have proper h1 and h2 definitions.

Example

Example proper h1 and h2

<h1>Headline</h1>
...
<h2>Headline</h2>
Importance

Content structure partly determines content quality. Headlines add to structure in a document. Missing headlines are indicators for poorly structured content and therefore indicate lower content quality. This may lead to lower rankings and less user interaction.

Operating Instruction

We suggest to properly assign h1 and h2 headlines to any document that is supposed to be indexed and ranked by search engines.

<h1> not found

Description

If the HTML does not contain a h1-headline, the URL is flagged with this hint. Discover all HTML documents on the crawled website, that are missing a proper h1 definition.

Example
<h1>Headline</h1>
Importance

Content structure partly determines content quality. Headlines add to structure in a document. Missing headlines are indicators for poorly structured content and therefore indicate lower content quality. This may lead to lower rankings and less user interaction. The h1 is the most important headline in the document. The h1 usually corresponds with the document title.

Operating Instruction

You might want to add a h1 to your HTML.

<img> alt attribute exists but empty

Description

If an image with an empty alt attribute is found, the URL is flagged with this hint.

Example
<img src="image.jpg" alt="" />
Importance

The alt-attribute defines the alternative information that will be shown, if the image file fails to load.

The alt-attribute is one of the factors that are used by search engines to determine the topic of the image. It also represents an alternative to blind users. By supplying a proper alt-attribute, you not only help search engines understand your site and rank your images, but also add to accessibility for disabled users.

Operating Instruction

If the image is not of decorative nature and contains information, you should consider adding a value for the alt-attribute.

If the image is of decorative- (i.e. spacer images, backgrounds, style enhancements with images in general) or functional nature (i.e. tracking pixel), you should consider using a more advanced technical solution like CSS or Javascript.

<img> has no alt attribute

Description

If an image without an alt-attribute is found, the URL is flagged with this hint. This report helps to identify all missing alt-attributes.

Example
<img src="file.jpg"/>
Importance

In terms of HTML validation, alt-attributes are requirements for images. The alt-attribute defines the altermative information that will be shown if the image file fails to load.

The alt-attribute is one of the factors that are used by search engines to determine the topic of the image. It also represents an alternative to blind users. By supplying a proper alt-attribute, you not only help search engines understand your site, but also add to accessibility for disabled users.

Operating Instruction

Add alt-attributes in all cases where it is missing.

Use a descriptive alt-attribute for images that contain information. You may use an empty alt-attribute if the images are only for decoration.

<link rel="canonical"> URL is not absolute

Description

If the canonical element specifies a URL relative to the document's URL, document's URL is flagged with this hint.

This report shows all occurrences of canonical usage with URLs that are not absolute.

Examples

Absolute URL

<link rel="canonical" href="http://example.com/folder/page.html">

Short URL

<link rel="canonical" href="page.html">

Short URL - root folder relative

<link rel="canonical" href="/folder/page.html">

Short URL - protocol relative

<link rel="canonical" href="//example.com/folder/page.html">
Importance

Using shortened URLs for canonical links can lead to several kinds of duplicate content issues:

  • duplicate content issues with different protocol versions
  • duplicate content issues with different domains
  • duplicate content issues with different folders
Operating Instruction

We suggest using absolute URLs for canonical links.

<link rel="canonical"> contains malformed or empty href

Description

This hint identifies all occurrences of canonical elements that contain an empty or invalid target URL.

Examples

Empty canonical

<link rel="canonical" href="">

Malformed canonical

<link rel="canonical" href="htp://example.com/">
Importance

Malformed or empty href in canonical links cause canonical definitions to be invalid and can cause issues with duplicate content when a document is available on more than one URL.

Operating Instruction

We suggest to check for malformed or empty canonical href on a regular base.

<link rel="canonical"> found outside <head>

Description

A canonical element was placed outside of the <head> section, search engines will ignore it.

This report helps you to identify all occurrences of canonical definitions, that are invalid due to being placed outside the <head> tag on the crawled website.

Example
<html>
  <head>
    ...
  </head>
  <body>
    ...
    <link rel="canonical" href="http://example.com/">
    ...
  </body>
</html>
Importance

Some search engines ignore improper canonical designation. If canonical definitions get ignored by search engines, this might cause issues with duplicate content and representation of the site in search results.

Operating Instruction

Keep your canonical definitions inside the HTML <head> tag, so they don't get ignored by search engines.

<link rel="canonical"> found twice

Description

More than one canonical elements was found, either as a <link> tag with rel="canonical" or an according link header.

This report shows all URLs with double canonical definitions on your website, that we were able to identify.

Examples

HTML Head

<link rel="canonical" href="http://example.com/">
<link rel="canonical" href="http://example.com/">

HTTP Header

Link: <http://example.com/>; rel="canonical"
Link: <http://example.com/>; rel="canonical"

HTML Head & HTTP Header

<link rel="canonical" href="http://example.com/">

Link: <http://example.com/>; rel="canonical"
Importance

Using more than one canonical link element can cause conflicting definitions or unexpected behaviour when documents are available on more than one URL at a time.

Operating Instruction

We suggest identifying all URLs that have more than one canonical link element defined. We also suggest looking for the reason behind the double definition, as this problem usually can be traced back to third party code (plugins, extensions and add-ons of the CMS).

If canonical definitions are found twice on a document, this often occurs due to usage of multiple SEO plugins or a SEO plugin in combination with manual canonical definitions.

<link rel="canonical"> found twice and differs

Description

More than one canonical elements have been found, either as a <link> tag with rel="canonical" or an according Link header. Additionally, they specify different targets.

This report allow you to identify all occurrences of double canonical definitions with conflicting target URLs.

Examples

HTML Head

<link rel="canonical" href="http://example.com/">
<link rel="canonical" href="http://example.com/page1.html">

HTTP Header

Link: <http://example.com/>; rel="canonical"
Link: <http://example.com/page1.html>; rel="canonical"

HTML Head & HTTP Header

<link rel="canonical" href="http://example.com/">

Link: <http://example.com/page1.html>; rel="canonical"
Importance

Having more than one canonical link element with different target URLs in a document can cause search engines to ignore the canonical definitions. This might lead to issues with duplicate content.

Operating Instruction

We suggest correcting all conflicting canonical definitions by removing the unnecessary definition.

<link rel="canonical"> points to other URL

Description

If the canonical element is found and points to a different URL, the URL is flagged with this hint.

Use this report to identify all instances of canonical elements pointing to other URLs.

Examples

The canonical link element points to the SSL version of the document:

Canonical link element for http://example.com/page.html

<link rel="canonical" href="https://example.com/page.html">

The canonical link element points to a URL without GET-parameter:

Canonical link element for http://example.com/page.html?a=1

<link rel="canonical" href="http://example.com/page.html">
Importance

The canonical link URL specifies a prefered version of a document that is available on more than one URL at a time.

By using a canonical link element pointing to another URL, you are telling search engines to prefer the target URL in search results.

If URLs that are not supposed to be shown in search results are part of the internal link graph, this can lead to waste of crawl budget.

Operating Instruction

You might consider changing internal links to point directly to the prefered version of the document to save crawl budget.

You might also want to evaluate if multiple URLs for one document are necessary at all.

<meta description> missing or empty

Description

If the meta-description is missing or empty, the URL is flagged with this hint. Use this report to identify all URLs that are missing a proper meta description.

Example
<html>
<head>
...
<meta name="description" content="">
...
Importance

The meta description is usually the first choice for the description text in search results snippets. If the meta description is missing, you give up control over the appearance of your documents in the search results. Search engines will then use parts of the documents content as a description, which might lead to unexpected appearance of a site's snippets in search results.

Operating Instruction

We suggest using proper meta descriptions for all documents that are supposed to be indexed by search engines.

<meta description> occurs more than once

Description

If a meta description tag is found more than once in teh HTML, the URL is flagged with this hint.

Example
<html>
<head>
...
<meta name="description" content="First meta description">
<meta name="description" content="Second meta description">
...
Importance

Having more than one meta description can lead to unexpected appearance of the URL in search results. This may result in lower user engagement and therefore a drop for user signals for your site. This may eventually hurt the rankings of the website.

Operating Instruction

There should be only one meta-description for a URL.

Error scenarios like this usually appear due to different software automatically adding meta descriptions. If this issue occurs on a large scale, check if there is a script or CMS plugin automatically adding meta descriptions to your documents.

<meta description> too long for Google snippet

Description

If the meta description is too long to be displayed in the snippet in search results, the URL is flagged with this hint.

Example
<html>
<head>
...
<meta name="description" content="Example.com - The very best long meta descriptions online - We have one of the longest meta descriptions in the internet.">
...
Importance

If the meta description is too long to be displayed in the snippet in search results, it will be shortened by the search engine. This usually results in less appealing snippets and lower user engagement. Lower user engagement might lead to negative user signals, which can be regarded as a ranking factor by modern search engines and eventually lead to worse rankings of the site in search results.

Operating Instruction

We suggest to analyze the Click-through rates from search results to URLs with a meta description, that is too long to be shown properly in search snippets. If a URL flagged with this hint performs low in terms of Click-through rate, you may want to consider shorten the meta description.

<title> found outside <head>

Description

A <title> tag was placed outside of the <head> section, where it may have no effect. Use this report to identify all occurences of misplaced HTML <title> tags.

Example
<html>
<head>
...
</head>
<body>
...
<title>Title of the Site</title>
...
Importance

The <title> tag is a very important element for search engine optimization and should always be set. If the title tag is placed outside the HTML <head>, it may be ignored by search engines. This may lead to issues with the search snippet and the site's ranking in search results.

Operating Instruction

If this hint shows up in your crawl report, you should move all misplaced title tags into the HTML <head> section.

<title> missing or empty

Description

If the <title> tag is missing, the URL is flagged with this hint. Use this report to identify all case of missing title tags on the crawled website.

Example

Empty Title

<html>
<head>
...
<title></title>
...
Importance

The <title> tag is a very important element for search engine optimization and should always be set. The document's title is the primary resource for the title of the snippet in search results. If the <title> tag is missing or empty, one of the most important ranking factors is basically left out. This will very likely harm the ranking in search results and can also harm the Click-through rate from search results for the given URLs.

Operating Instruction

If this hint shows up in your crawl report, you should add title tags to all found URLs.

<title> occurs more than once

Description

If the <title> tag is found more than once in the source code, the URL is flagged with this hint.. There should be only one title for a document.

Example
<html>
<head>
...
<title>Welcome to Example.com</title>
<title>Example.com - Best Examples in the Internet</title>
...
Importance

The HTML <title> tag is an important ranking factor, as it is literally supposed to describe the content of the document. Having more than one HTML <title> tags can therefore lead to unexpected appearance of the URL in search results. Additionally it might harm the rankings of the document.

Operating Instruction

If this hint shows up in your crawl report, you might want to make sure you only use one title tag on all found URLs.

Error scenarios like this usually appear due to different software automatically adding HTML <title> tags. If this issue occurs on a large scale, check if there is a script or CMS plugin adding HTML <title> tags to your documents.

<title> short or single word

Description

If the title of a document has less than 10 chars or consists only of a single word, the URL is flagged with this hint.

Example
<html>
<head>
...
<title>Example</title>
...
Importance

The HTML <title> tag should sum up the content of the document, so it's easy to understand what the document is all about. It should be descriptive as well as appealing. Very short titles usually tend to be neither. Using very short titles may lead to lower user engagement as well as lower rankings in search results.

Operating Instruction

If this hint shows up in your crawl report, consider writing more descriptive and appealing titles for the URLs flagged with this hint.

<title> too long for Google snippet

Description

If the title of a document is too long to be displayed in the snippets in search results, the URL is flagged with this hint.

Example
<html>
<head>
...
<title>Example.com - Best Examples Site - We have one of the the longest titles in the internet</title>
...
Importance

If the title of a docuemnt is too long to be displayed in the snippet in search results, it will be shortened by the search engine. This usually results in less appealing snippets and lower user engagement, which might eventually hurt your site's rankings in search results.

Operating Instruction

You might want to change the title so the title could be displayed in the snippet without beeing shortened.

Linking: Follow link to a so far no-follow URL

Description

A follow link was found, linking to a URL that was previously linked "nofollow" only.

The linking URL will be flagged with this hint and the target URL will be flagged as "No-Follow linking revoked later on".

This reports helps to identify inconsistency in usage of rel=nofollow.

Example
Linking URL Target URL Link Relation
http://example.com/page.html http://example.com/target.html nofollow
http://example.com/page2.html http://example.com/target.html follow
Importance

A single follow link will allow the target URL to be crawled, even though it was previously forbidden by nofollow links.

Inconsistency in usage of rel=nofollow can lead to unexpected behaviour depending on your situation.

  • If the target URL is supposed to be recognized by search engines, nofollow linking will weaken the URL. Removing nofollow from internal links can lead to an uplift in ranking.
  • If the target URL is not supposed to be recognized by search engines, a single follow link will allow the target URL to be crawled.

Note: In a document that is using the robots directive "nofollow" a link with "rel=follow" is identified as "follow".

Operating Instruction

If you encounter this hint when crawling your website, we suggest to:

  • Evaluate if rel=nofollow is needed
  • Make sure to use follow or nofollow consistently

Linking: Nofollow link to a follow URL

Description

A link with rel="nofollow" was found, linking to a URL that was previously linked "follow" already.

This reports helps to identify inconsistency in usage of rel=nofollow.

Example
Linking URL Target URL Link Relation
http://example.com/page.html http://example.com/target.html follow
http://example.com/page2.html http://example.com/target.html nofollow
Importance

Inconsistency in usage of rel=nofollow can lead to unexpected behaviour depending on your situation.

  • If the target URL is supposed to be recognized by search engines, nofollow linking will weaken the URL. Removing nofollow from internal links can lead to an uplift in ranking.
  • If the target URL is not supposed to be recognized by search engines, a single follow link will allow the target URL to be crawled.
Operating Instruction

If you encounter this hint when crawling your website, we suggest to:

  • Evaluate if rel=nofollow is needed
  • Make sure to use follow or nofollow consistently

Linking: Nofollow linking revoked later on

Description

A URL that has been linked no-follow has later - that is on the same or a deeper level - been linked to as follow. By removing the initial no-follow directive, this URL may be lifted up some levels.

This reports helps to identify inconsistency in usage of rel=nofollow.

Example
Linking URL Target URL Link Relation
http://example.com/page.html http://example.com/target.html nofollow
http://example.com/page2.html http://example.com/target.html follow
Importance

Inconsistency in usage of rel=nofollow can lead to unexpected behaviour depending on your situation.

  • If the target URL is supposed to be recognized by search engines, nofollow linking will weaken the URL. Removing nofollow from internal links can lead to an uplift in ranking.
  • If the target URL is not supposed to be recognized by search engines, a single follow link will allow the target URL to be crawled.
Operating Instruction

If you encounter this hint when crawling your website, we suggest to:

  • Evaluate if rel=nofollow is needed
  • Make sure to use follow or nofollow consistently

Robots: Specified more than once

Description

Robots directives for a single URL were specified more than once. Use this report to identify all instances of multiple robots definitions.

Examples

Robots meta tag in HTML <head>

<meta name="robots" content="index">
<meta name="robots" content="follow">

Robots directives in X-Robots-Tag and meta tag

HTTP/1.1 200 OK
Date: Tue, 16 October 2015 10:01:33 GMT
X-Robots-Tag: index, follow
...

<meta name="robots" content="index, follow">
Importance

More than one instance of robots directives can lead to conflicting definitions or in a directive being left out. This may result in a range of issues with privacy, indexing in general and crawl budget, depending on the situation.

Operating Instruction

Use only one way to specify the robots directive.

Robots: follow

Description

The URL is set to "follow" by a robots directive, either per robots meta tag or the X-Robots-Tag header. If there are no robots directives specified, the URL will regarded as if "index, follow" was specified.

Discover all occurrences of "follow" robots directives or meta tags with this hints report.

Examples

Robots meta tag in HTML <head>

<meta name="robots" content="index, follow"

Robots directives in HTTP-header X-Robots-Tag

X-Robots-Tag: index, follow
Importance

If a URL is set to "follow" and there are no robots.txt restrictions interfering, search engines will usually follow all links in the document and crawl the target URLs.

Operating Instruction

We suggest to use the follow directive for robots by default.

Robots: index

Description

The URL is set to "index" by all robots directives, either per robots meta tag or the X-Robots-Tag header.

Find all URLs that are set to “index" with this report.

Examples

HTML tag

<meta name="robots" content="index, follow">

X-Robots-Tag in HTTP header

HTTP/1.1 200 OK
Date: Tue, 16 October 2015 10:01:33 GMT
X-Robots-Tag: index
...
Importance

The “index" directive for robots tells search engines the document is supposed to be indexed. Having URLs indexed that are not supposed to be indexed, can lead to

  • Issues with privacy
  • Issues with indexing budget
  • Issues with thin content or duplicate content
Operating Instruction

We suggest to check on a regular base, if there are parts of the site set to “index", that are not supposed to end up in the search results. There are several ways to deal with this situation, depending on requirements:

  • Set URLs to “noindex", if they should not appear in search results
  • Make links to these URLs not crawlable
  • Use URL Removal Tool offered by search engines like Google
  • Block crawling in robots.txt
  • Block access to the URLs

Robots: nofollow

Description

The site is set to "nofollow" by a robots directive, either per robots meta tag or the X-Robots-Tag header.

Find all instances of “nofollow" usage that have been discovered crawling your site.

Examples

Robots meta tag in HTML <head>

<meta name="robots" content="index, nofollow">

X-Robots-Tag in HTTP-header

X-Robots-Tag: nofollow
Importance

Using the “nofollow" directive for a URL tells crawlers not to follow any links in the document. This also prevents PageRank flow to the target URLs. By using nofollow for internal links, you weaken your site.

Using the "nofollow" robots directive affects

  • PageRank flow
  • Website structure
  • Crawling
Operating Instruction

URLs that use the nofollow robots directive should be evaluated on a regular base to prevent possible issues. Nofollow should not be used for internal linking.

Instead you should consider setting the document to robots follow.

Robots: nofollow differs across specifications

Description

There is more than one source for robots, either a robots meta tag or a X-Robots-Tag header, and at least one specifies "nofollow" while another does not.

Examples

Robots meta tag in HTML <head>

<meta name="robots" content="index, nofollow">
<meta name="robots" content="index, follow">

Note: a more subtile way to produce this error would be conflicting definitions by omiting parts of the directive, like in:

<meta name="robots" content="index, nofollow">
<meta name="robots" content="index">

Robots directives in X-Robots-Tag and meta tag differ

HTTP/1.1 200 OK
Date: Tue, 16 October 2015 10:01:33 GMT
X-Robots-Tag: index, nofollow
...

<meta name="robots" content="index, follow">
Importance

The "nofollow" robots directive tells crawlers not to follow the links in a document. This can be used on purpose to prevent search engines from crawling the linked URLs.

Having conflicting definitions is unconclusive. Search engines will usually use the most restrictive directive they find. The Audisto Crawler adapts this behaviour.

Operating Instruction

Use only one way to specify the robots nofollow directive.

Robots: noindex

Description

The site is set to "noindex" by a robots directive, either per robots meta tag or the X-Robots-Tag header, but still part of the internal link graph.

Examples

Robots meta tag in HTML <head>

<meta name="robots" content="noindex, follow">

X-Robots-Tag in HTTP-header

X-Robots-Tag: noindex, follow
Importance

Using the “noindex" directive for a URL tells crawlers not to index the document. This also prevents the URL from showing up in the search results. If URLs with robots "noindex" directive are part of the internal link graph, they still get crawled and consume crawl budget. This may lead to issues with the crawlrate. These URLs also bind internal linkjuice and - on a large scale - can harm your sites rankings.

Legit use of noindex

A legit reason to keep URLs on "noindex" would be legal restrictions, like an imprint or privacy policy.

Problematic use of noindex

Using noindex on URLs, that are supposed to give structure to the site, e.g. categories, important tags, HTML sitemaps, should be avoided.

If URLs are supposed to give structure to a site in terms of SEO, then they should also add value for the user.

Operating Instruction

We strongly suggest reviewing your sites "noindex" URLs on a regular base to prevent issues with crawl budget and internal PageRank flow. If there is no need to keep a URL, that is set to noindex, it should be dropped with a 410 status code.

Try to improve structure URLs on an individual base. If these URLs are adding value to the user, they'll be worthwile to get indexed as well.

If noindex is used on URLs generated by sorting and filtering options, make sure to use a PRG-pattern instead of linking to these URLs directly.

Robots: noindex differs across specifications

Description

There is more than one source for robots directives, either a robots meta tag or a X-Robots-Tag header. At least one specifies "noindex" while another does not.

Examples

Differing robots directives across specifications could look like this:

Robots Meta tag in HTML header

<meta name="robots" content="index, nofollow">
<meta name="robots" content="noindex, nofollow">

Note: a more subtile way to produce this error would be conflicting definitions by omiting parts of the directive, like in:

<meta name="robots" content="noindex, follow">
<meta name="robots" content="follow">

Robots directives in X-Robots-Tag and meta tag differ

HTTP/1.1 200 OK
Date: Tue, 16 October 2015 10:01:33 GMT
X-Robots-Tag: index, follow
...

<meta name="robots" content="noindex, follow">
Importance

The "noindex" robots directive tells crawlers not to index the current document.

Having conflicting definitions is unconclusive. Search engines will usually use the most restrictive directive they find. The Audisto Crawler adapts this behaviour.

Operating Instruction

Use only one way to specify the robots noindex directive.

URL has more than 115 characters

Description

If the URL is more than 115 characters long, it is flagged with this hint.

Example
http://subdomain.example.com/folder1/folder2/folder3/folder4/folder5/folder6/very_long_page_filename.html?a=1&b=2&c=3&d=4
Importance

Long URLs are hard to read and often not fully or properly displayed, e.g. snippets in search results, posts in bulletin boards or social media websites. If a URL is too long, it might get shortened and not be fully displayed.

115 was the maximum count of characters, that Google displayed in their snippets in search results some time ago. As of now, it is not a fixed number of characters any more, but instead a pixel length is used by Google.

Operating Instruction

If you encounter occurences of this hint, we suggest to utilize shorter URLs so they can be properly displayed.

This may be done by reducing the number of:

  • GET-parameters
  • Folders in the path
  • Characters in filename
  • Using IDs instead of speaking URLs